AURA Conquering the Grind Vancouver Sun Blog Post

AURA Conquering the Grind Vancouver Sun Blog Post

Sponsored by AURA Nutrition

Conquering the Grind

When women try to do it all, it often comes at the expense of health and wellness. Here’s how small changes and a new mindset can make all the difference. 

By Kristi Alexandra
Postmedia Content Works

It’s no surprise that self-care has been a popular buzzword of late.

With entrepreneurship on the rise, burning the proverbial candle at both ends has been an all-too-common phenomenon of the past decade.

Just last year, the World Health Organization (WHO) identified burnout as a syndrome of chronic work-related stress. A study at the University of Montreal in 2018 reported that women were more likely than men to experience burnout at work.

“I think we’ve reached this stage where women are trying to do everything and it’s never enough,” says Kate Marshall, co-founder and VP of marketing at AURA, a holistic supplement line dedicated to women’s wellness.

“I go to events, I sit in town hall women’s discussions, and this is the common thread of all of the messaging I’m receiving from females right now. And I get it. I’m one of these women who are trying to do everything and it’s never enough.”

Marshall says the “work and grind at all costs” mindset needs to give way to one of one of self-care and healthy habits.

“We need a shift in mentality. It’s 2020 and this new decade is going to give people the extra push to say, ‘I’m not going to do the same things I did last decade.’ The next decade needs to see a shift to mental wellness,” Marshall says.

But the motivation to live a holistically well, healthy lifestyle? That’s tricky. The science seems to suggest it’s not about getting motivated to try a fad diet or overworking yourself. Instead, there are three key components to take into account if you want to see a major change in your lifestyle: 

Know What You Need

“Women’s bodies are so complex and so unique and really require so much more attention in nutrition than men’s do,” says nutritionist and health educator Kirstin Berrington.

“As a woman and a nutritionist, I am aware of how often my nutritional needs will change during different periods of my life. Menstruation, pregnancy, breastfeeding and menopause are all reasons nutrient demands fluctuate and so, as women, we need to be extra mindful about what we are eating,” she wrote on the AURA blog.

Berrington advises that different supplements could suit different women at different stages in life.

For one, she says, collagen is optimal for pregnant or post-partum women because it helps with skin re-hydration and cell recovery. It’s also a great booster for women “as we age because wrinkles and skin elasticity becomes quite a concern.”

An MCT (multi-chain triglyceride) energy powder, she notes, is great for brain health and cognitive function, which women will be paying more attention to in their 40s and 50s.

 

"Women’s bodies are so complex and so unique and really require so much more attention in nutrition than men’s do.”

 

AURA Conquering the Grind Vancouver Sun Blog Post

Meet Yourself Where You’re At

When women resolve to be healthier, there’s an impulse to start working out or signing up for classes or go cold-turkey on all your not-so-good habits. Beware the all-or-nothing mentality, as that’s often a recipe for a quick burnout. Instead, Marshall advises, knows that you’re doing enough and that your own lifestyle can be a baseline for future changes.

“We’re meeting them where they’re at right now with the product,” Marshall enthuses about AURA’s offerings.

“They don’t have to change to nourish themselves mid-day with a shake, instead of crashing or starving themselves or grabbing something that’s not healthy. That’s meeting them where they are, and then secondary is this idea that you are enough and we can take breaks. Our vision of connecting women and wellness is multi-faceted this way.”

Make Small Changes

From a supplement standpoint, science is simple. Better vitamins and minerals in your diet mean a better functioning mind and body, which means less crashing and overall healthier life. Once again, the motivation is the hard part.

“If motivation was all we needed to be where we want to be, then why aren’t we all where we want to be at with our love lives, our jobs, the money we want to be making? It’s really all about developing good habits, and habits start small,” Marshall says.

“Take something that’s become a negative habit, like skipping breakfast for example. By the time lunch rolls around, your brain is foggy and you’re exhausted and hungry. So, flashback to that morning: take 20 seconds to put a scoop of protein in a shaker of cold water, shake it up, drink it down. Now that mini-habit is a baseline for all of the other amazing habits that will come to fruition from that little one.”

Kate Marshall Profile

Kate Marshall is the co-founder of AURA, a holistic supplement product line formulated for women. She brings more than 15 years of experience in business, as well as a lifelong dedication to athleticism, even being the seventh fastest woman to complete Vancouver’s Grouse Grind.

“The food industry never really aligned with what I wanted to do,” she admitted to Postmedia. “Other staff would want to hang around after a shift and go out or have drinks, and I would always be like ‘Sorry, I’ve got to go home and go to bed because I have a spin class at 6 a.m.’”

Her female-focused company offers up products such as collagen boosters, energy supplements, brain function enhancers and protein supplements all in a powder form. Each product is specifically created with females in mind—and it’s not just a clever marketing ploy. Now, she’s leading a team of nutritionists and doctors to bring wellness to women in Vancouver and across North America.

 

This story was created by Content Works, Postmedia’s commercial content division, on behalf of AURA Nutrition.

 

Copyright Postmedia Network Inc. 2020



Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out